Legislative Report

Kook Dean
V.P. Legislative
April 2019

 

From the 2018 UPC Guide to Important Code Changes
What Changed.
1201.0 General.

1201.1 Applicability. The regulations of this chapter shall govern the installation of fuel gas piping in or in connection with a building, structure or within the property lines of premises up to 5 pounds-force per square inch (psi) (34 kPa) for natural gas and 10 psi (69 kPa) for undiluted propane, other than service pipe. Fuel oil piping systems shall be installed in accordance with NFPA 31.

12165.6 Variable Gas Pressure. Where the supply gas pressure exceeds 139 inches 5 psi (34.6 kPa) of water column for natural gas and 277 inches 10 psi (69 kPa) of water column for undiluted propane or is less than 6 inches (1.5 kPa) of water column, or where diversity demand factors are used, the design, pipe, sizing, materials, location, and use of such systems first shall be approved by the Authority Having Jurisdiction. Piping systems designed for pressures exceeding the serving gas supplier’s standard delivery pressure shall have prior verification from the gas supplier of the availability of the design pressure.

Why It Changed.

The UPC contains pipe sizing tables up to 5 psi for natural gas and up to 10 psi for propane. There was no need to require AHJ approval for fuel gas piping systems that the UPC already has requirements for and permit to be installed. Natural gas suppliers routinely offer 2 psi supply pressure for many residential and light commercial and 5 psi for large commercial installations. “Inches of water column” is typically used up to 14″ (1/2 psi). Pressures exceeding 1/2 psi shall be in psi.

What It Means to Me.

Engineers and designers need to be aware that gas piping designs are only regulated by Chapter 12 Fuel Gas Piping, any gas piping systems that require higher gas pressures than 5 psi for natural gas and 10 psi for undiluted propane shall be first approved by the AHJ and verified with the gas supplier that higher pressures can be provided.

Plans examiners and inspectors shall verify the plans and specifications coordinate with appropriate gas pressures and if higher gas pressures are incorporated in the plans that the AHJ approves such plans and the gas supplier is aware of the requirements for higher gas pressure and code requirements of this section are met.

What Changed.

404.0 Waste Fittings and Overflows.

404.1 Waste Fittings. Waste fittings shall comply with ASME A112.18.2/CSA B125.2, ASTM F409 or Table 701.2 for aboveground drainage piping and fittings.

404.2 Overflows. Where a fixture is provided with an overflow, the waste shall be so arranged that the standing water in the fixture shall not rise in the overflow where the stopper is closed or remain in the overflow where the fixture is empty. The overflow pipe from a fixture shall be connected to the house or inlet side of the fixture trap, except that overflow on flush tanks shall be permitted to discharge into the water closets or urinals served by them, but it shall be unlawful to connect such overflows with any other part of the drainage system.

Why It Changed.

Overflows are associated with waste fittings, therefore it was appropriate to expand this section to regulate both overflows and waste fittings. The new section 404.1 would have the reference to the two standards that regulate waste fittings, ASME A112.18.2/CSA B125.2 and ASTM F409. These two standards are listed in Chapter 17, however, they were not specifically identified in Chapter 4. This change adds the appropriate reference. Section 404.1 has been revised to 404.2 with a change in the title. The remainder of the section is unchanged.

ASME A112.18.2/CSA B125.2 addresses plumbing waste fittings of sizes 2 inches and smaller and ASTM F409 addresses waste fittings made of plastic materials only. The intent of the section is to provide the AHJ as to the proper mounting dimensions and connections. The new standards provides safety requirements needed for the safe installation of waste fittings such as test methods and maximum leakage amounts.

What It Means to Me.

Not all plumbing fixtures are required to have an overflow. For example, the applicable standards for plastic, enameled cast iron, enameled steel, and ceramic plumbing fixtures do not require overflows for lavatories, sinks and bidets. However, the four standards referenced in Section 409.1 require bathtubs and whirlpools constructed of ceramic, cast iron, enameled steel, stainless steel or plastic meet the minimum dimensions illustrated in the standard, which includes an opening for an overflow. When an overflow is provided, whether mandatory or optional, the fixture waste shall be so arranged that the standing water in the fixture cannot rise in the overflow when the stopper is closed or remain in the overflow when the fixture is empty. The only time water is permitted in the fixture overflow is when the fixture is filled to the point of overflow.

The overflow pipe from a fixture must connect only on the house or inlet side of a fixture trap except for the overflow on a flush tank. The flush tank may discharge into the water closet or urinal it serves. An overflow is not permitted to bypass the trap of the fixture it serves. It may either be an integral part of the fixture or a separate fitting.

When waste and overflow fittings are used and are concealed, as in most bathtub installations, they must be constructed from materials approved for drainage pipe. When they are exposed or accessible, they may be of seamless drawn brass, not less than No. 20 B & S gauge (0.032 in.) (0.8 mm) in thickness, or other approved material as per Section 701.4.

Engineers and designers will be required to ensure in their plans and specifications comply with the listings and standards for waste, overflow and continuous waste pipe and fittings for lavatories, bathtubs, kitchen sinks and similar fixtures.

Plans examiners and inspectors shall verify the plans and specifications for plumbing fixtures meet the minimum required listings waste, overflow and continuous waste piping for the plumbing fixtures. Field inspectors should verify the waste, overflow and continuous waste piping installed on the job comply with the appropriate listings.

1201.1 Applicability. The regulations of this chapter shall govern the installation of fuel gas piping in or in connection with a building, structure or within the property lines of premises up to 5 pounds-force per square inch (psi) (34 kPa) for natural gas and 10 psi (69 kPa) for undiluted propane, other than service pipe. Fuel oil piping systems shall be installed in accordance with NFPA 31.

12165.6 Variable Gas Pressure. Where the supply gas pressure exceeds 139 inches 5 psi (34.6 kPa) of water column for natural gas and 277 inches 10 psi (69 kPa) of water column for undiluted propane or is less than 6 inches (1.5 kPa) of water column, or where diversity demand factors are used, the design, pipe, sizing, materials, location, and use of such systems first shall be approved by the Authority Having Jurisdiction. Piping systems designed for pressures exceeding the serving gas supplier’s standard delivery pressure shall have prior verification from the gas supplier of the availability of the design pressure.

Why It Changed.

The UPC contains pipe sizing tables up to 5 psi for natural gas and up to 10 psi for propane. There was no need to require AHJ approval for fuel gas piping systems that the UPC already has requirements for and permit to be installed. Natural gas suppliers routinely offer 2 psi supply pressure for many residential and light commercial and 5 psi for large commercial installations. “Inches of water column” is typically used up to 14″ (1/2 psi). Pressures exceeding 1/2 psi shall be in psi.

What It Means to Me.

Engineers and designers need to be aware that gas piping designs are only regulated by Chapter 12 Fuel Gas Piping, any gas piping systems that require higher gas pressures than 5 psi for natural gas and 10 psi for undiluted propane shall be first approved by the AHJ and verified with the gas supplier that higher pressures can be provided.

Plans examiners and inspectors shall verify the plans and specifications coordinate with appropriate gas pressures and if higher gas pressures are incorporated in the plans that the AHJ approves such plans and the gas supplier is aware of the requirements for higher gas pressure and code requirements of this section are met.

What Changed.

404.0 Waste Fittings and Overflows.

404.1 Waste Fittings. Waste fittings shall comply with ASME A112.18.2/CSA B125.2, ASTM F409 or Table 701.2 for aboveground drainage piping and fittings.

404.2 Overflows. Where a fixture is provided with an overflow, the waste shall be so arranged that the standing water in the fixture shall not rise in the overflow where the stopper is closed or remain in the overflow where the fixture is empty. The overflow pipe from a fixture shall be connected to the house or inlet side of the fixture trap, except that overflow on flush tanks shall be permitted to discharge into the water closets or urinals served by them, but it shall be unlawful to connect such overflows with any other part of the drainage system.

Why It Changed.

Overflows are associated with waste fittings, therefore it was appropriate to expand this section to regulate both overflows and waste fittings. The new section 404.1 would have the reference to the two standards that regulate waste fittings, ASME A112.18.2/CSA B125.2 and ASTM F409. These two standards are listed in Chapter 17, however, they were not specifically identified in Chapter 4. This change adds the appropriate reference. Section 404.1 has been revised to 404.2 with a change in the title. The remainder of the section is unchanged.

ASME A112.18.2/CSA B125.2 addresses plumbing waste fittings of sizes 2 inches and smaller and ASTM F409 addresses waste fittings made of plastic materials only. The intent of the section is to provide the AHJ as to the proper mounting dimensions and connections. The new standards provides safety requirements needed for the safe installation of waste fittings such as test methods and maximum leakage amounts.

What It Means to Me.

Not all plumbing fixtures are required to have an overflow. For example, the applicable standards for plastic, enameled cast iron, enameled steel, and ceramic plumbing fixtures do not require overflows for lavatories, sinks and bidets. However, the four standards referenced in Section 409.1 require bathtubs and whirlpools constructed of ceramic, cast iron, enameled steel, stainless steel or plastic meet the minimum dimensions illustrated in the standard, which includes an opening for an overflow. When an overflow is provided, whether mandatory or optional, the fixture waste shall be so arranged that the standing water in the fixture cannot rise in the overflow when the stopper is closed or remain in the overflow when the fixture is empty. The only time water is permitted in the fixture overflow is when the fixture is filled to the point of overflow.

The overflow pipe from a fixture must connect only on the house or inlet side of a fixture trap except for the overflow on a flush tank. The flush tank may discharge into the water closet or urinal it serves. An overflow is not permitted to bypass the trap of the fixture it serves. It may either be an integral part of the fixture or a separate fitting.

When waste and overflow fittings are used and are concealed, as in most bathtub installations, they must be constructed from materials approved for drainage pipe. When they are exposed or accessible, they may be of seamless drawn brass, not less than No. 20 B & S gauge (0.032 in.) (0.8 mm) in thickness, or other approved material as per Section 701.4.

Engineers and designers will be required to ensure in their plans and specifications comply with the listings and standards for waste, overflow and continuous waste pipe and fittings for lavatories, bathtubs, kitchen sinks and similar fixtures.

Plans examiners and inspectors shall verify the plans and specifications for plumbing fixtures meet the minimum required listings waste, overflow and continuous waste piping for the plumbing fixtures. Field inspectors should verify the waste, overflow and continuous waste piping installed on the job comply with the appropriate listings.

404.0 Waste Fittings and Overflows.

404.1 Waste Fittings. Waste fittings shall comply with ASME A112.18.2/CSA B125.2, ASTM F409 or Table 701.2 for aboveground drainage piping and fittings.

404.2 Overflows. Where a fixture is provided with an overflow, the waste shall be so arranged that the standing water in the fixture shall not rise in the overflow where the stopper is closed or remain in the overflow where the fixture is empty. The overflow pipe from a fixture shall be connected to the house or inlet side of the fixture trap, except that overflow on flush tanks shall be permitted to discharge into the water closets or urinals served by them, but it shall be unlawful to connect such overflows with any other part of the drainage system.

Why It Changed.

Overflows are associated with waste fittings, therefore it was appropriate to expand this section to regulate both overflows and waste fittings. The new section 404.1 would have the reference to the two standards that regulate waste fittings, ASME A112.18.2/CSA B125.2 and ASTM F409. These two standards are listed in Chapter 17, however, they were not specifically identified in Chapter 4. This change adds the appropriate reference. Section 404.1 has been revised to 404.2 with a change in the title. The remainder of the section is unchanged.

ASME A112.18.2/CSA B125.2 addresses plumbing waste fittings of sizes 2 inches and smaller and ASTM F409 addresses waste fittings made of plastic materials only. The intent of the section is to provide the AHJ as to the proper mounting dimensions and connections. The new standards provides safety requirements needed for the safe installation of waste fittings such as test methods and maximum leakage amounts.

What It Means to Me.

Not all plumbing fixtures are required to have an overflow. For example, the applicable standards for plastic, enameled cast iron, enameled steel, and ceramic plumbing fixtures do not require overflows for lavatories, sinks and bidets. However, the four standards referenced in Section 409.1 require bathtubs and whirlpools constructed of ceramic, cast iron, enameled steel, stainless steel or plastic meet the minimum dimensions illustrated in the standard, which includes an opening for an overflow. When an overflow is provided, whether mandatory or optional, the fixture waste shall be so arranged that the standing water in the fixture cannot rise in the overflow when the stopper is closed or remain in the overflow when the fixture is empty. The only time water is permitted in the fixture overflow is when the fixture is filled to the point of overflow.

The overflow pipe from a fixture must connect only on the house or inlet side of a fixture trap except for the overflow on a flush tank. The flush tank may discharge into the water closet or urinal it serves. An overflow is not permitted to bypass the trap of the fixture it serves. It may either be an integral part of the fixture or a separate fitting.

When waste and overflow fittings are used and are concealed, as in most bathtub installations, they must be constructed from materials approved for drainage pipe. When they are exposed or accessible, they may be of seamless drawn brass, not less than No. 20 B & S gauge (0.032 in.) (0.8 mm) in thickness, or other approved material as per Section 701.4.

Engineers and designers will be required to ensure in their plans and specifications comply with the listings and standards for waste, overflow and continuous waste pipe and fittings for lavatories, bathtubs, kitchen sinks and similar fixtures.

Plans examiners and inspectors shall verify the plans and specifications for plumbing fixtures meet the minimum required listings waste, overflow and continuous waste piping for the plumbing fixtures. Field inspectors should verify the waste, overflow and continuous waste piping installed on the job comply with the appropriate listings.

The plumbers, installers or technicians need the knowledge and experience to recognize the appropriate listed waste, overflow and continuous waste piping for plumbing fixtures are being installed in compliance with the code and its listings.